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Language

While linguists use the term Serbo-Croatian to define the language spoken in Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro, Serbo-Croatian officially no longer exists. In Bosnia-Herzegovina, was officially adopted three national languages: Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian.

While linguists use the term Serbo-Croatian to define the language spoken in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro, Serbo-Croatian officially no longer exists. Bosnia and Herzegovina has officially adopted three national languages: Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian.

The difference between these three languages is slight, often imperceptible to outsiders. In addition, speakers can understand eachother without a translator. Their definition is historical and political.

By cons, there are partial differences of vocabulary (certain words, some conjugations or declensions vary), but the biggest difference is in the alphabet. The Bosnian and Croatian languages use the Latin alphabet, while the Serbian uses the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. Interestingly, some elements of the Turkish language are found in the Bosnian language.

English is widely spoken throughout the country, especially among the younger population, business oriented population and administrative officials. A large Bosnian Diaspora exists in the United States, Canada and Australia, as well as in the United Kingdom. In addition to English, German is also a commonly spoken language because Bosnian Diaspora lives and works in Germany and Austria. Over the past couple of years the Turkish language has become quite popular and is spoken among youth, but mostly those who are either enrolled in one of the two Turkish universities in Sarajevo or have Turkish friends. On the other hand, French and Russian languages are pretty much extinct.

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